Intralesional steroid Injection

An intralesional steroid injection involves a corticosteroid such as triamcinolone acetonide injected directly into a lesion on or immediately below the skin.

What are intralesional steroids used for?

An intralesional steroid injection may be indicated for the following skin conditions:
• Alopecia areata
• Keloid/hypertrophic scar
• Localised psoriasis
• Acne cysts (see nodulocystic acne)
• Inflamed epidermoid cysts
• Other localised inflammatory skin diseases.

What are the benefits of intralesional steroids?

Intralesional administration of corticosteroids treats a dermal inflammatory process directly. In contrast to topical steroids, intralesional steroids:
• Bypass the barrier of a thickened stratum corneum
• Reduce the chance of epidermal atrophy (surface skin thinning)
• Deliver higher concentrations to the site of the pathology.

How is intralesional steroid administered?

Intralesional triamcinolone is injected directly into the skin lesion using a fine needle after cleaning the site of injection with alcohol or antiseptic solution.

The initial dose per injection site will vary depending on the lesion being treated. Generally, 0.1–0.2 mL is injected per square centimetre of involved skin. It can be repeated every 4–8 weeks.

What side effects may arise at the site of an intralesional steroid injection?

Early effects tend to be self-limited. They include:
• Pain, bleeding, bruising
• Infection

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Dr Anita Ghadge has a passion for skin health

Dr Anita Ghadge is a doctor with a diploma in Dermatology, with over 9 years in the medical field. She has a passion for treating skin conditions and optimising skin health.

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Dr Anita Ghadge has a passion for skin health

Dr Anita Ghadge is a doctor with a diploma in Dermatology, with over 9 years in the medical field. She has a passion for treating skin conditions and optimising skin health.

Contact Us